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Business Insider: The Top 100 Digital Startups

Business Insider has gathered a list of 100 companies from all around the world (these lists are always skewed a little and it's almost impossible to make them globally valid). The list is naturally ranked with lots of US based startups, but quite a few Nordic ones are on the list as well. Company valuation is used to organise the companies.

At 15th position we have Rovio, just below Airbnb and above Mozilla, with a proposed valuation of $1.2 billion. At 17 is Spotify from Sweden, just above Kayak. Number 27 is Trulia, a US-based company co-founded by Sami Inkinen, a Finn.

There is one Russian company that caught my eye as well - Ozon.ru at position 45. Sulake, the creators of Habbo Hotel is ranked at 50. At 91 is Eucalyptus Systems, run by Mårten Mickos the former MySQL CEO.

Missing from the list are two obvious candidates from China: Tencent and Alibaba. These two companies are some of the largest digital companies in the world. Tencent, the creators of the hugely popular QQ in China are valued at about 27 billion euros on the Hong Kong Stock exchange while Alibaba is valued at around 470 million euros (at the time of writing).

Then again - I'll let you in on a secret from a media point of view. Lists are great for a few reasons; they fuel the self confidence of the startups on the list and also drive traffic to any site with them as people try to get an overall view of the situation. Lists are very rarely complete and thus actually don't do a great job in what they set out to do.

But why does everything have to be so serious? It doesn't and in this view, lists are kind of fun - as long as you understand they're not the absolute truth.

Image by jontintinjordan

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D41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e?s=48
, October 07, 2011

The topics of this article is confusing because the original article listed companies not start-ups. I would not consider, for example, Mozilla a start-up anymore. The same goes for Facebook.